Zone 34

Rotary Tool Box

Tool # 3 - The Positive

 

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Our typical approach to improvement is to "solve the problems", which often drains us of our energy and leaves us exhausted.  The approach suggested here is to build your Rotary Club by encouraging members to look for and to talk about what they see as good and then to consider ways to create more of that which is positive.

The following illustrates how this approach could be used by a Rotary District Governor to promote and grow the good things that are happening in the district's Rotary Clubs:

 

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Prior to the DGs visit to each club, the President would announce that next week we will have a discussion rather than a speaker and I would like everyone to use this week to think about what is good about Rotary that we want more of.

 

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Then the next week each member will stand and say one thing that he or she sees as being good about Rotary (locally, in the district, or internationally) that we need more of, and a person will record each statement in a few words.

 

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At the end of the meeting, the recorder will review what has been written to find the themes mentioned by the club members

 

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The Board will then consider these themes at its next board meeting prior to the DGs visit.

 

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During the DGs meeting with the Board, preferably prior to his meeting with the club, the Board will talk about the top one or two themes and what could come as a result of the dialogue and energy within the club.

 

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If there are some especially worthwhile stories that come from these visits of the DG with the clubs, they will be featured at the District Conference.  The intent there will be for clubs to share their stories of good news and positive energy with others who may gain insights and energy to take home to their own club.

 

This approach is  called Appreciative Inquiry and has been taught at Case Western Reserve University (http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu/)